Symposium3

Plenary Talk

Presenter:

Prof. Kenichi Yoshikawa

Self-organization Science Research Center, Doshisha University / Institute for Advances Study, Kyoto University

Title:

Cooperation of Real-World Modeling with Simulation Creates New Horizon on Biosciences

Abstract:

Living matter is manipulating large number of different molecules to create spatio-temporal self-organization. Currently, many numerical studies have been carried out to shed light on the underlying mechanisms of life. Sometimes, these studies remain as a possible explanatory interpretation because of the complexity of actual living systems. In the present talk, I would like to show some examples of real-world modeling, which help us to obtain deeper understanding in biological systems. 1) Emergence of cell-like structure and function under crowding condition with macromolecules. 2) Self-organization of cellular assembly. 3) Self-generation of macroscopic regular motion for the assembly of nano-scaled self-propelling objects.

Biography:

Name
Kenichi Yoshikawa
URL: http://dmpl.doshisha.ac.jp/
Academic Degree
PhD, Physical Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University (1976)
Professional Appointments
1998 – 2012
Professor, Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University
2011 – 2014
Chair, Commission of Biological Physics C6, IUPAP
2012 –
Professor, Faculty of Life and Medical Sciences, Doshisha University
2019-
Specially Appointed Prof., Institute for Advances Study, Kyoto University

Invited Talk

Presenter:

Prof. Yoshiteru Yonetani

National Institute for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology

Title:

Water on the DNA Surface: Microscopic Insight from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

Abstract:

Water on the DNA surface exhibits characteristic behavior such as ice-like water network along the narrow groove of DNA. By using molecular dynamics simulations, we obtained detailed picture for such water; our characterization fully describes the water network patterns and their sequence variation [Biophys. J. 97, 1138 (2009)]. Analysis on such water network further revealed microscopic origin of the slow water-exchange kinetics [Biophys. Chem. 160, 54 (2012)]. As another relevant topic, I will also mention a relation with DNA damage production. Our recent study [Chem. Phys. Lett. 749, 137441 (2020)] found that site-dependent water accessibility for DNA backbone is well correlated with the probabilities of DNA damage production by OH radical attacking. This suggests that the site-dependent hydration property is a key factor for DNA damage production.

Biography:

Yoshiteru Yonetani received B.E. and Dr. degrees from Keio University in 1998 and 2002, respectively. He worked as a postdoctoral researcher at Nara Women’s University (2002-2003) and Japan Atomic Energy Agency (2004-2008). He is currently a senior researcher in National Institutes of Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology. His current interests include molecular dynamics and quantum dynamics in biological and chemical physics.

Tutorial Talk

Presenter:

Dr. Miyuki Sasaki

Collaborative Laboratories for Advanced Decommissioning Science, Japan Atomic Energy Agency

Title:

Visualizing the dose rate distribution around the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant using Artificial Neural Networks.

Abstract:

This study proposes a method of visualizing the ambient dose rate distribution using artificial neural networks (ANN) from airborne radiation monitoring results. The ANN method was applied to the results of the airborne radiation monitoring which was conducted around the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant by an unmanned aerial vehicle. The ANN was constructed by training data consisting of input variable dataset (radiation count rate, altitude, topographic data, photographic RGB data) and objective variable dataset (the air dose rate data at 1 m above the ground level). The reliability of the ANN method was evaluated by comparison with the ground-based survey data. The dose rate map created by the ANN method reproduced ground-based survey results better than traditional methods.

Biography:

Miyuki Sasaki received Dr. Eng. degrees from the University of Nagoya, Japan, in 2021. She became a researcher at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency in 2015. Her current research interests include radiation measurement.